Monday, February 20, 2017

Oldhammer: Rise of Rogue Trader


Confrontation on the red wastes!

Games Workshop has come a long way in the past 10 years in terms of miniature production, taking advantage of new technology to create more dynamic models that are easier to assemble and trim. You would have a hard time arguing that the older metal Keeper of Secrets holds up to the newer plastic one. Despite this, I often find myself looking back at many of the older models, from 2nd edition 40k and Rogue Trader, with special fondness. This is partially due to nostalgia from back when I started with the hobby, but also due to the wonky charm present in many of the earlier sculpts, sculpts that were not aided by computer design or even the internet for reference material. Recently, I have tried to incorperate some older models into some of my conversions, as a way to celebrate the venerable models, particularly with my my Pilgrym warband. You can imagine my excitement when I found a local shop that was selling a whole assortment of old Rogue Trader blisterpacks! It seemed to be an opportunity that I couldn’t pass up, and I purchased a whole bunch of them, ranging from Imperial Agents to Orks. I have long admired the work of exemplars in the “oldhammer” community like Don Hans (Realm of Citadel), Alex (Leadbaloony), Axiom (Magpie and Old Lead), and Warburton (Warhammer 40,000 2nd Edition), just to name a few. And having found all these Rogue Trader models I decided it would be fun to build two small warbands of the models, with the goal of playing some games of Rogue Trader in the future!

The old blister design stayed relatively unchanged for many years until the introduction of the plastic clampacks for the multipart plastic character models.

Mad Morris in all his oddly proportioned glory. Back in these early days, rifle stocks were not heresy ;)

His paint scheme, white/grey armor and pale blue fatigues, was inspired by Weirding Way’s Navigator House Akuhm.

When starting to paint the “Beakie” tinboy, I knew I needed to paint him as a Ultramarine circa 1995.

I made sure to paint some checkers and Ork glyphs on the Tinboyz’ oversized shoulderpads.

To paint the models’ bases I used Games Workshop’s technical paints Martian Ironearth and Ironcrust. I also tried to add a little of the dark ork humor with the addition of a Skitarii foot.

The next few Rogue Trader models I am working on! I particularly like the chaotic ork with the Left Hand of Doom. ;)

While this is only the first two models, I hope to paint a lot more of these Rogue Traders models over the year, including a few more Ork Tinboyz! Let me know what you think and if there are any particular classic models you love!

- Adam Wier

15 comments:

  1. Oh man those look bloody brilliant mate - fantastic paint jobs on them both; great colour choices and execution. Really looking forward to what you do with the Commissar. I'm sure there's some old artwork that has him front and centre in it.

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    1. I am glad you like the models and the paint jobs on them! It was really refreshing to work on largely unmodified models. Additionally since they were all single piece models they were a lot easier to paint! I feel the Commissar will be one of the next that I look to paint. :)

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  2. They realy do look nice with a more modern paint style. I recently picked up and copy of space crusade from a work mate doing a clear out and it's basically all still on sprew just missing the Chaos marines I think. So conflicted as I could play with modern models and paint stuff to use that will get used in 40k games and sell the on sprew stuff to someone how appreciates them. But you know classic game should probably have classic models, I'm so conflicted.

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    1. Thanks for the comment. I have always loved seeing others paint older models in more modern schemes. It has been fun actually trying myself. :)

      Space Crusade! Finding any of the older GW models still unassembled and on sprues is really challenging (lots of eBay searching...). Most of the stuff you find is partially assembled and painted, making them difficult to work with.

      I feel that using either the old models or newer ones would work for Space Crusade. I think the most important part is actually playing the game itself. Whatever allows you to more quickly start playing the better (like if you already have painted models that could be used in the game I would use them). Pretty much all of GW's games come with leagues of models. While on one hand that is great (who wouldn't want more figures!), on the other it can prevent you from actually playing (It sure has for me anyway...).

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    1. I am always interested in acquiring older sculpts!

      I love the individuality and diversity present in a lot of the older models. Each model was a character in their own right, rather than the rank and file figures seen in Warhammer 40,000 today.

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  4. Very nice paintjobs on these guys! I really get a kick out of seeing RT minis painted to a high standard :)

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    1. Thank you for the kind words! I have quite a number of Rogue Trader models lining up to be painted. I need to find time to get to them all!

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  5. Brilliant work on some classic figures - looking forward to more ;) .. and to seeing what sort of Rogue Trader games you play (I have to admit I have never played RT myself, just 2nd ed.

    Some of the plastic figures these days are quite brilliant, and certainly they are better quality than figures of the past. But the old metal figures do have a certain charm of design which I don't think is 100% nostalgia. Just look at the old metal Slambo and the new resin one up for pre-order - the metal version is a far more accomplished design, even if it is cruder in some aspects due to technological limitations of the time.

    Also, whilst I can stand to assemble a few plastics (say for a gang or warband) the prospect of assembling a whole army of them fills me with dread at the prospect of the tedium! Give me simple, one piece, metal figures any day!

    Thanks for the mention of my blog too, glad you like it :)

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    1. We will certainly document any Rogue Trader games we end up playing when the two warbands are assembled and painted.

      I hear you about assembling an entire army of plastic models. I am not sure I would be able to assemble an entire army before my interest would be pulled to another hobby project.

      I love the original version of Slambo. I really should look into finding one of the originals...

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  6. Congrats on finding such a lucky haul of old minis! These look great.

    Those old figures will always have a place in my heart since I cut my modelling teeth (and hands, and fingers) on converting those old metal minis when I started RT in the 80's, but I'll take the modern plastics any day for creating new projects.

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    1. I could not believe my luck when I stumbled upon them in a local comic shop (all tucked away in a glass display case that looked like it was rarely opened). I knew it was a sign that I needed to get into Oldhammer!

      The modern plastics are certainly the way to go now for converting and designing your own warbands. Every time I go back and work on a metal model I am surprised by how hard the material is (particularly when compared to the metal used by other manufactures).

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    2. From what I remember, the late 80's figures weren't too bad for cutting up, but the early/mid-90's figures changed the metal somewhat, and those were incredibly hard. I think the first figures had more lead in the mix maybe?

      In either case, I didn't discover hobby saws until years later, and cut myself more times I'd like to admit chopping up figures with just a knife.

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  7. These are really really well painted._ i miss mutyfigure blisterpacks._ i have often mused about recreating those carpet stepped eavy metal photo shoots. And naming each character along with made up codes and prices . Nice find

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    1. I am glad you think I was able to do the models justice! I also miss the old blister packs, and going into a shop and ruffling through all of the blisters, trying to find something unexpected. Some of the old ‘Eavy Metal photo shoots were great; they are ingrained in my mind, and what brought me to the hobby!

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